The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home


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What is it like working in a nursing home?

But about her songs, she is not confused. She offered detailed edits. Herzog told Ms. And it is hard work. And the songs helped her remember her loves. Music therapy, a board certified health profession that has about 7, practitioners nationwide, is becoming more prevalent in nursing homes and hospices because of sessions like those shared between Ms.

Kelly and Mrs. Herzog, which helped Mrs. Herzog feel like she was being heard. And within that, there is a developing subspecialty in Ms. About 15 percent of music therapists now work in geriatric settings, and about 10 percent with terminally ill patients, according to a employment survey by the American Music Therapy Association , which asked about 1, music therapists. When he started in the field in , he was perhaps the first full-time music therapist in an American hospice, he said. While it has not been proven to extend life, multiple studies have shown music therapy can improve quality of life, inspire feelings of peace, spirituality and hope, and reduce pain.

More studies are continuing, as music therapists seek to make their profession as central in end-of-life care as social workers and chaplains. Currently, most insurance companies and government-funded health programs do not cover music therapy directly. So we are directly opposing this feeling of loss with a feeling of creation. At the Hebrew Home, which has residents, Ms.

Kelly is the sole creative arts therapist who specializes in end-of-life care in a team of 12 art, drama, movement and music therapists. Instead this author is a preacher with too many stats and studies about the benefit of pet therapy. If anyone wants to read this book, they already know all of this. And I felt a bit too much self-congratulations at her volunteer work with Pransky, the dog, at the county nursing home. More stats about old people, and more studies that have been done, blah blah blah. No thread of a stor First I feel duped. No thread of a story.

It seems fair to me that we all know the benefits of pets and how vital they are in healing all ALL kinds of illnesses both emotional and physical. Don't quote over and over again all of these facts. And of course the mountain of characters. Could not wait for the thing to be over. Possibly the dullest dog book I've read in ages. Mar 22, Heidi Marleau rated it it was amazing. A thoroughly enjoyable book. Sweet, insightful and instructive. My husband is thinking about going forward with getting our dog trained and certified to be a therapy dog so this was a perfect read. But even if you aren't on that path Jun 14, Terri rated it it was ok.

The stories of the rest home patients are sweet, though. May 01, Lee McClain rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-read-in Loved this book--pretty deep for a dog story--fun and moving at the same time. You won't zoom through it, you'll savor it. And want to get a therapy dog yourself! Sep 17, Olivia rated it it was amazing. This is for all intents a "mom book" so given to me by my mom and if you don't like dogs don't bother reading it because you've already proven yourself immune to heartfelt things.

But it was a surprisingly well written, honest look into not only death but the act of dying - something we are eager to either ignore or fictionalization. Sep 12, Jennifer W rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. A feel good kind of book which is what I needed right now.

Extra special because the dog in the book didn't die or get hurt and make me sad! There is a wonderful quote from Pope Benedict on charity that was included towards the end of the book: "What hinders this humane and loving gaze towards our brothers and sisters? Often it is the possession of material riches and a sense of sufficiency, but it can also be the tendency to put our own interests and problems above all else.

We should never be in A feel good kind of book which is what I needed right now. We should never be incapable of 'showing mercy' towards those who suffer. Our hearts should never be so wrapped up in our affairs and problems that they fail of hear the cry of the poor Reaching out to others and opening our hearts to their needs can become an opportunity for salvation and blessedness. That I don't have to give all, but I can still give something. The fact that I get paid to give may go against what Benedict was saying here, but I could chose to get paid doing something else, something mindless.

As I struggle to stay optimistic, I have to remind myself that I cannot allow anger and fear to control me. In this book, a little dog showed up weekly to a nursing home and was her little dog self. She was happy to see everyone, happy to help everyone, in her own little way. Fear and anger cloud that in people. When Sue Halpern found herself and her Labradoodle, Pransky, at a loose end, she searched for ways in which to keep them both busy. Of the options available, Sue felt Pransky would make a wonderful pet therapy dog and began the process of training for certification. Reigning in Pransky's natural exuberance was no small task but within a few months, having passed the assessment process, Sue and Pransky walked into the County Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center to meet its residents.

Halpern int When Sue Halpern found herself and her Labradoodle, Pransky, at a loose end, she searched for ways in which to keep them both busy. Halpern introduces us to the men and women she and Pransky visit each week, who suffer a variety of ailments from simple old age to genetic diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimers. The stories are sweet, touching and poignant and it is evident that Pransky's presence benefits those that spend time with her, providing companionship, comfort, and joy. It is equally clear that Halpern and Pransky also benefit from the time they spend at the facility.

A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home is " Each chapter is framed by one of the seven Virtues and includes anecdotes of Sue and Pransky's visits with the residents of the nursing home, interspersed with commentary on philosophy, religion, social policy, scientific research and healthcare. Feb 22, Patrick44 rated it really liked it. It seems that many people expect this to be another dog book and they are disappointed that it is not so much about the dog or the training of a therapy dog. I am sympathetic and empathetic to those disappointments. However, in reading the title more carefully, it more than equally suggests that it is about what happens when the dog walks into the nursing home: what happens to the dog; what happens to the owner and; what happens to the nursing home inhabitants.

What happens is that lessons are learne It seems that many people expect this to be another dog book and they are disappointed that it is not so much about the dog or the training of a therapy dog. What happens is that lessons are learned by everyone involved. The dog learns to become more sensitive and gains more self-control. The owner learns a greater appreciation for the individuals and what they are experiencing in that environment.

So, THAT's what happens and much more when a dog walks into a nursing home. Mar 30, Lori rated it liked it Shelves: animals-dogs , non-fiction. I bought this book because of the title and the adorable dog on the cover.

see

A Day in the Life of a Nursing Home Director

I am a pushover for books about dogs. When I read this was about a therapy dog who goes to nursing homes I had to try this book. I really wanted to like this book more. I was really hoping this book would be about Pranksy and the nursing home residents. Part of this book does talk about the residents and Pranksy. A lot of I bought this book because of the title and the adorable dog on the cover. A lot of the book is taking about the Philosophy and the psychological benefits of dogs and human contact.

I will give this a three since part of it does address the dog and those who lived at the nursing home.


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Sep 21, Trisha Coonce rated it did not like it. I was really disappointed in this book. The summary on the cover boasted about a heartwarming and profound story of a dog that spends days lifting the spirits of those in nursing homes. However, two chapters in I was already annoyed, bored, and skimming the pages.

Experiencing Life, Briefly, Inside a Nursing Home

The author seems to feel the need to fill the pages with facts about therapy dogs and nursing homes, along with paragraphs and paragraphs about several philosophers. I enjoy philosophy, don't get me wrong.. But I didn't pick up this bo I was really disappointed in this book. But I didn't pick up this book to read all the general background about every important value of a subject I already know. The author never actually got to the point and it felt as if she was trying to prove her own intelligence more so than explain what her musings had to do with the book.

I skimmed through the first half of the book without ever really finding anything enjoyable. Mar 28, Kirsti rated it really liked it Shelves: true-animal-stories. This was somewhere between a three and four for me. I see other reviews like mine, wishing there was more dog stories. Seriously though, every time the author started ging into facts, or quoting philosophy or the bible, I zoned out and had to reread that part.

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It's very annoying to see, that shocking moment you realize you are reading a book and not living the story. They mostly felt unnecessary, and I just wasn't invested enough after being jolted into self awareness. However, I loved Pransky.

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I really enjoyed the way she didn't judge, the friends she's made. The writing was good without the interruptions. I've read dozens of animal stories over the past few years and this one rates highly. The dog makes it worth while anyway.


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  • Jun 23, Karen rated it really liked it. The author trained her dog to be a therapy dog at her local nursing home, thinking the dog needed some sort of outlet besides lying around all day while she worked at home writing. A fairly quick read, I expected this to be mostly about the dog. And there was a lot about how wonderful the dog was, but what I didn't see coming were all the wonderful stories and insight about nursing home residents. Pransky, the dog, may have made an impression on some of the residents, but equally so, those resid The author trained her dog to be a therapy dog at her local nursing home, thinking the dog needed some sort of outlet besides lying around all day while she worked at home writing.

    Pransky, the dog, may have made an impression on some of the residents, but equally so, those residents made an impression on the author. Recommended for any dog lover, or fan of heartwarming people stories either!

    Things Nursing Homes Are Not Allowed to Do

    Sep 18, Kristi rated it really liked it. I so enjoyed this book. I admit that before I read it as part of a book club, I had already assumed it to be silly, emotional, and vapid. It was none of these things. I think better words to describe this book would be insightful, lovely, compelling, honest, and charming. Yes, this was a story about a dog and her owner visiting a nursing home, but it was also an educated and wise treatise on the philosophy of life, death, kindness, loss, virtue, hope, friendship, and love.

    It made my heart happy I so enjoyed this book. It made my heart happy, even though there was also sadness intertwined. And I just want to hug that sweet dog. Shelves: animals. This book defies classification: it's that rare dog story that doesn't end with the dog's death, because it's not just about the dog. It's a book about end of life issues and the realities of nursing home life, and it's an examination of what virtue means. Philosophical, insightful, humorous, this would be a good book club read. Sep 16, Saturday's Child rated it liked it.

    This is more than just a dog story it also has insight into life in a nursing home. It made me both happy to read about what the author and her dog did but also sad when thinking about growing older. Aug 31, Jan rated it really liked it Shelves: animals. If cancer itself caused the bone to fracture, no dice. The study, using data from the National Health and Retirement Study from through , looked at more than 5, people who initially lived in the community — that is, not in a facility.

    About 30 percent used the skilled-nursing facility benefit during the final six months of life; those people were likely to be over 85 and family members said, after their deaths, that they had expected them to die soon. The benefit is commonly referred to as S. The choice to use S. Almost 43 percent of those who used it died in a nursing home and almost 40 percent in a hospital.

    Just 11 percent died at home, though that is where most people prefer to die, studies repeatedly show.

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    In effect, nursing homes were providing end-of-life care, expensively and probably not so well, for almost a third of the elderly population. The skilled-nursing facility benefit, Dr. Aragon pointed out in an interview, is meant to provide rehabilitation.

    The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home
    The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home
    The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home
    The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home
    The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home The Ends of Time: Life and Work in a Nursing Home

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